Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Unfit to Command

In order to prepare for the quadrennial circus in 2004, I read the thoroughly-researched book Unfit for Command by John O’Neill and Jerome Corsi.  It had to do with John Kerry, the democrat nominee running for president against George Bush, the incumbent.  There were plenty of stories about Kerry’s unfitness but I wanted the truth from the horse’s mouth.  O’Neill had served in Vietnam and took over Kerry’s “swift-boat,” with crew of six, after Kerry’s departure to the states.

In order to prepare for the 2008 circus, I read Obama’s sort of autobiography, Dreams from My Father, that he wrote in the 1990s, obviously considering himself important enough in his thirties to be worthy of self-aggrandizement. I seem to remember that the publisher meant for the book to be about race or racial relations but that didn’t happen.

In order to prepare for the current quadrennial circus, I’ve read exhaustively-researched Hillary’s America by the highly respected political author Dinesh D’Souza. In reading all of these books, I’ve gained important insights about the candidates. One of the most clear-cut attributes that Kerry and Hillary Clinton share is that of telling humongous lies almost as a way of life. By his actions, Obama shares this trait in spades, while his book indicated his feelings toward whites—that “typical white person” tag he awarded the grandmother who raised him.

Kerry’s lies before a Congressional committee in 1971 regarding U.S. troops in Vietnam are the stuff of legend. He served as a swift-boat commander in actual combat territory for three months and received three Purple Hearts without any hospitalization or even one day off-duty, with two certainly but probably all three resulting from Kerry’s own mistakes such as launching a grenade too close to the boat and giving himself a tiny piece of shrapnel easily removed, no stitches, just a band-aid. Band-aids were the bandages needed for all his “wounds.”

With three Purple Hearts, a GI could request shipment home, and Kerry did though the usual tour in Vietnam was one year. Kerry became a war-protester and famously (or infamously or, more likely, not at all) “threw his medals over the fence.” One of his most repeated (by himself) lies was that he spent Christmas in Cambodia, with President Nixon assuring Americans that no GI was in Cambodia. Kerry was nowhere near Cambodia…at least 50 miles away. Nixon wasn’t even president in December 1968.

Kerry traveled to France to “meet” with the North Vietnamese representatives and parley for an end to the war. At least that’s the story, as if a junior Naval Reserve officer could do such a thing. As a GI, he probably committed a crime but who cared? He was a harmless egoist, who even had movies made of himself running up and down a Vietnamese beach and looking tough. He consistently wrote false reports and probably wrote the necessary documentation for one of his medals.

D'Souza goes far beyond just Clinton (and Obama) and traces the Democrat Party back to its beginnings, claimed by D'Souza to have started with Andrew Jackson. He applies through its history (time-line and main characters/entities such as Alinski and Tammany Hall) the ways it comports with Clinton's take on everything, including her seemingly pathological lying and deviousness vis-a-vis ethnic minorities, the Indians in Jackson's days and African-Americans today.

The latter group should read the book to see how blacks are perennially manipulated by democrats…for nothing but blind and misplaced loyalty to the welfare state meticulously designed to keep blacks “in their place.” D’Souza correctly calls this the return to the plantation mentality, beginning in the 1930s. The comparison to 1830 is startling.

Breathtaking is D’Souza’s accounting of the sheer greed that drives Clinton and hubby Bubba. She may break the national “glass ceiling,” but if she does she will introduce through its cracks corruption that matches or outdoes any that’s gone before.

And so it goes.
Jim Clark

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